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Pull Up A Seat To Our Favorite April Recipe: Arnold Palmer Pan-Roasted Chicken Thighs

We're always searching for the best recipes to share with you all! We found one that we think you all will surely enjoy during April! Have you ever had an Arnold Palmer? Have you had it with your chicken before? What about together?! Our friends over at Kitchen brought to our attention the amazing combination, and we had to share this with you all! The flavors of the drink — bitter, sweet, and sour — are a perfect match for roast chicken. Here the drink is transformed into a brine by brewing a big batch of black tea and adding some lemon juice, sugar, and salt. After bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs have hung out in the brine for a few hours, they're pan-roasted along with lemon slices that release their juices and caramelize while the chicken skin gets dangerously crispy.

The resulting chicken is lemon-tinged, with the flavor of black tea playing casually in the background. Serve it over steamed rice and add a green salad or roasted broccoli, and serve it with a tall glass of this dinner's namesake drink. We hope to see a couple of these dishes being sold on the app if you're ever looking for something new to cook or try for the #foodies in Orlando, Florida and Springfield, MO!

Recipe For Arnold Palmer Pan-Roasted Chicken


Serves 4 to 6

 

For the brine:
4 cups water
4 black tea bags, like Lipton or Twinings
3 (2-inch) slices of lemon peel about an inch wide
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup kosher salt
2 tablespoons lemon juice

For the chicken:
2 pounds chicken thighs, bone-in and skin-on, about 4 to 6
Olive oil
Freshly ground black pepper
1 lemon, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon honey

Bring the water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Turn off the heat, add the tea bags and lemon peel, cover the pot, and let the tea steep for 10 minutes. Uncover, remove the tea bags, stir in the sugar and salt, and let the mixture cool to room temperature.

Place the chicken thighs in a large zip-top bag and pour in the tea and lemon juice. Refrigerate for 2 to 4 hours.

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Remove the chicken from the brine, pat it dry with paper towels, and season it with pepper.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large cast iron or oven-safe skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, but not smoking, add the chicken to the skillet, skin-side down and evenly spaced apart. Cook until the fat is rendered and the skin is crisp and golden-brown, adjusting the heat if the skin begins to burn, about 6 to 8 minutes.

Carefully flip the chicken, skin-side up, and scatter over the lemon slices, tucking a few slices underneath the chicken. Place skillet in oven and cook for another 10 to 12 minutes. Brush skin with honey and cook 1 to 2 minutes more or until chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165°F.

Pull Up A Seat To FIVE Easter Recipes From Around The World!

There's so many delicious recipes that you can try from all over the world this Easter! Spice up your normal Easter routine with some cuisine from other countries! We've found some amazing dishes from the around the world that we are sure will be a hit in your home! Who knows? Maybe at the end of all of your cooking you could share your mouth watering creation with the rest of your city by posting a listing on PULL UP A SEAT! 

1. Sicilian Easter Lamb Pie Popular in Sicily during the Easter season, this pie was traditionally make with a whole leg of lamb, bones and all.  Including the bones fortifies the filling and makes for a succulent, juicy pie.  You may consider modernizing the recipe by using thinly boneless lamb shoulder or cubes of boneless leg of lamb. Get the recipe here: Easter Lamb Pie from Saveur

1. Sicilian Easter Lamb Pie

Popular in Sicily during the Easter season, this pie was traditionally make with a whole leg of lamb, bones and all.  Including the bones fortifies the filling and makes for a succulent, juicy pie.  You may consider modernizing the recipe by using thinly boneless lamb shoulder or cubes of boneless leg of lamb.

Get the recipe here: Easter Lamb Pie from Saveur

2.  Scottish Blueberry Lemon Buttermilk Scones Biscuits and scones scream Easter to me.  In this recipe, I took a traditional Scottish pastry and added the classic American ingredients of blueberries, lemon, and buttermilk.  The scones have a crispy exterior and a light, tender crumb inside.  They are just barely sweet from the blueberries, lightly tangy from the buttermilk, and become addictive from the crunchy sugar topping. Get the recipe here: Blueberry Lemon Buttermilk Scones

2.  Scottish Blueberry Lemon Buttermilk Scones

Biscuits and scones scream Easter to me.  In this recipe, I took a traditional Scottish pastry and added the classic American ingredients of blueberries, lemon, and buttermilk.  The scones have a crispy exterior and a light, tender crumb inside.  They are just barely sweet from the blueberries, lightly tangy from the buttermilk, and become addictive from the crunchy sugar topping.

Get the recipe here: Blueberry Lemon Buttermilk Scones

3. Italian Gubana Gubana is a traditional Easter treat originating from the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia, located in the very northeastern part Italy, bordering Slovenia and Austria.  The sweet bread-cake hybrid is known for its characteristic snail shape from the filling spiraling throughout the crumb of the bread. The filling, traditionally a mix of chocolate, nuts, raisins, and sweet wine, often includes the addition of breadcrumbs, cookie crumbs, citrus zest, and spices. In Italy, a wedge of gubana is usually served with a splash of grappa. Get the recipe here: Gubana from Food52

3. Italian Gubana

Gubana is a traditional Easter treat originating from the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia, located in the very northeastern part Italy, bordering Slovenia and Austria.  The sweet bread-cake hybrid is known for its characteristic snail shape from the filling spiraling throughout the crumb of the bread. The filling, traditionally a mix of chocolate, nuts, raisins, and sweet wine, often includes the addition of breadcrumbs, cookie crumbs, citrus zest, and spices. In Italy, a wedge of gubana is usually served with a splash of grappa.

Get the recipe here: Gubana from Food52

4. French Leg of Lamb If you’re in a French home on Easter Sunday, you’re likely to find a leg of lamb for the traditional holiday meal. The French take Easter seriously, with the festivities extending through the weekend and Monday and including activities such as egg hunts and egg rolling competitions. Get the recipe here: French Roasted Leg of Lamb from PopSugar

4. French Leg of Lamb

If you’re in a French home on Easter Sunday, you’re likely to find a leg of lamb for the traditional holiday meal. The French take Easter seriously, with the festivities extending through the weekend and Monday and including activities such as egg hunts and egg rolling competitions.

Get the recipe here: French Roasted Leg of Lamb from PopSugar

5. Hot Cross Buns There are many myths and traditions surrounding hot cross buns.  Some say that hot cross buns shared with friends will cement friendships, others claim that hot cross buns hung from the rafters on Good Friday will stay fresh for the next year.  It’s also been said that the buns will protect the kitchen from evil spirits, preventing fires and ensuring all breads will rise.  In 1592, Queen Elizabeth even declared hot cross buns as too special to be sold on any day other than Good Friday, Christmas, or a burial.  Aside from all of the legend, hot cross buns are a delicious treat and a fun way to bring Easter tradition and folklore into your kitchen. Get the recipe here: Hot Cross Buns from The Pioneer Woman

5. Hot Cross Buns

There are many myths and traditions surrounding hot cross buns.  Some say that hot cross buns shared with friends will cement friendships, others claim that hot cross buns hung from the rafters on Good Friday will stay fresh for the next year.  It’s also been said that the buns will protect the kitchen from evil spirits, preventing fires and ensuring all breads will rise.  In 1592, Queen Elizabeth even declared hot cross buns as too special to be sold on any day other than Good Friday, Christmas, or a burial.  Aside from all of the legend, hot cross buns are a delicious treat and a fun way to bring Easter tradition and folklore into your kitchen.

Get the recipe here: Hot Cross Buns from The Pioneer Woman

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